Notes


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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 "5 3/4lbs" - birth announcement Glover, Phyllis Marie (I17146)
 
2 "A woman of notable character, she leaves behind the record of a well spent life." (obit. Mt.Morris Union) Galbraith, Jane Ravey (I14183)
 
3 "Adopted daughter of Joel Russel" as is written on her cemetery marker in the Howard Rural Cemetery. It would be my understanding that Sarah is probably a daughter of Joel's second wife, Sally, from a previous marriage. Russel, Sarah S. (I1504)
 
4 "after living an upright life for a goodly number of years died childless." Hendee, John Mark (I1790)
 
5 "Died suddenly excessive use of alcolic liquor" from death record. Elson, Caroline (I24643)
 
6 "Father of German Valley" Neighbor, Leonhard (I3510)
 
7 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I14281)
 
8 "had 12 or 13 children" Some sources have David Bailey marrying Polly Margerum, (Esther Mitchel, Polly Mitchell's neice says Polly Mitchell married David Bailey and had 12 or 13 children) Mitchell, Mary (I11830)
 
9 "Historical Collections - Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society"
Vol. XIV, Lansing, 1908, p. 92: Alvin Leighton, son of Benjamin and
Sarah Leighton, was born in Maine, February, 3 1809. When ten years
of age his father removed to the State of New York, his mother having
died when he was three years old. They settled in Wayne Co, NY, coming
to that place in a one horse vehicle, changing from wheel to sleigh,
and sleigh to wheel, as the roads required. 
Hill, Sadie F. (I6862)
 
10 "I have lost my dear wife Edith,
She has bid us all adieu,
She has gone to live in Heaven,
And her form is lost to view.
Oh! that dear one, how I loved her
Oh, how hard to give her up!
But an angel came down to her
And removed her from our flock."
~Husband
(K Allen - taken from Memoriam card)
 
Munsey, Laura Edith (I2394)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I19208)
 
12 "If the grave spared worth and tallent he would not be mourned" Curry, Robert F. (I30215)
 
13 "In Dansville, Oct.5, Eliza L., adopted daughter of Edmund and Susan
L. Hartman, aged 1 years, 11 months and 27 days."[CI:249:?1:CI] 
Hartman, Eliza L. (I11185)
 
14 "In Sparta, Feb.10, Amidon, son of Hiram and Lucinda Hartman, aged 2
years, 7 months and 9 days." 
Hartman, Amidon S. (I7495)
 
15 "In West Sparta, Jan18, of diptheria, Alice O., daughter of Harmon Hartman, aged 9 years, 5 months and 7 days." Hartman, Alice O. (I10226)
 
16 "Issachar M. Burdett" Burditt, Issachar M. (I19631)
 
17 "It is said that he was killed in War of 1812." Haynes, Andrew (I3644)
 
18 "Jan 19, of diptheria, Nellie L., daughter of Harmon Hartman, aged 3
years, 2 months and 8 days." 
Hartman, Nellie L. (I10227)
 
19 "John Rudge, James Sargeant and Nathan Burditt on the 5th day of May,
1759, by the overseating of a small boat in a high gail of wind were
drowned between Boston and Winesimmit Providence ordered it so that an
aged woman mother to the said Burditt who was over him was saved alive
by takeing hold of an oar and a bag of bred." 
Burditt, Nathan (I8122)
 
20 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I11795)
 
21 "Le Petit" Claude
----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------
Claude (1st Gen.)
Claude Bouchard, son of Jacques Bouchard and Noelle Touschard, was
born in Saint-Cosme-de-Vair, France, in 1626. Saint-Cosme-de-Vair was
a community in the Department of the Sarthe, in Perche, and comprised
seven parishes. Claude considered himself to be from the parish of
Notre-Dame. He died on November 25, 1699 at the age of 73.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------
Why "Le Petit" ?
There were actually 6 or 7 different Bouchards who came to Canada (New
France) in the seventeenth century. Two of them were named "Claude"
Bouchard. One of these was a doctor (a surgeon) who came from Picardy.
In order to differentiate the two the doctor was referred to as
"Claude dit d'Orval" and the other as "Le Petit Claude". This latter
listed his occupation as tailor (un Taileur d'habits). His surname,
which means "The Small Claude", must have been because he was of
smaller stature than the other Claude. This nickname, however,
certainly was not merited when it came to his progeny, having 12
children of his own (6 boys and 6 girls) as a result of his union with
Louise Gagne, whom he married in Beaupre in 1654. Fortunate indeed
that he had 12 children, as my ancestor was the twelfth child in the
family.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------
His coming to New France
In order to understand the occasion of Claude's coming to New France
(Canada) one needs to have at least a brief understanding of the
colony and how the powers in France at the time (Louis XIII and Louis
XIV, along with the latter's Minister for the colonies Jean Baptiste
Colbert) went about the business of colonizing the new land.
From the beginning of the colony it was intended that the social order
in New France should rest upon a seignorial basis. This was a system
of land tenure, a method of apportioning land and bringing it into
production while avoiding the evils of speculation. Title to all the
land in the colony rested in the king, who would grant concessions to
seigneurs on the condition that they get their land cleared and made
productive. This required, as part of their grant agreement with the
crown, that the seigneurs enlist and establish settlers on their
lands, as well as build a mill for the settlers' use, and also
maintain a court of law to settle minor disputes.
A seigneur was not a landlord as we understand that term today. He had
obligations and responsibilities both to the crown and to his
settlers, and the authorities saw to it that he fulfilled them. The
same applied to the settlers. The seigneur was actually little more
than a land settlement agent and his finanacial rewards were not
great. Being a seigneur was still something to be eagerly sought after
since it gave one greatly enhanced social status, and this was
manifested in a variety of ways.
For their part these settlers, or "censitaires" as they were known
(although "habitants" is what they preferred to call themselves), were
required to clear the lands granted them by the seigneurs, and were
also obligated to pay modest dues (rents) in return. There were other
modest requirements imposed on the settlers in return for the land
concessions, which could be revoked if one did not fulfill his
obligations. A settler could eventually own his concession to the
point where he could even sell it, although if he sold it to anyone
other than a direct heir he had to pay 1/12 of the sale price to the
seigneur, and the latter also then had the right to buy the land at
the price offered by the would-be purchaser within forty days of the
sale. When land was sold, what the seller received was, in essence,
not the worth of the land but compensation for the improvements he had
made on it. This acted as a curb on land speculation.
One of the first seigneurs who fulfilled his trust to the letter was a
named Robert Giffard. Monsieur Giffard, a doctor who had come to New
France in 1627, was able to recruit several settlers beginning in 1632
(30 to 40 persons in 1632, and approximately the same number in 1635).
Between 1635 and 1663 he was able to recruit an additional 50 or so
persons, and this is where our Claude comes into the picture.
Claude Bouchard, a tailor, born in 1626, was from the Province of the
Maine, a native of Saint-Cosme-de-Vair. As I understand it this place
was actually in Perche, an area administered by the Province of the
Maine at the time. His father was Jacques Bouchard and his mother was
named Noelle Touschard. We know nothing of his youth except that he
was a member of Notre Dame parish in his home town. We do know that he
made a living as a tailor (un Taileur d'habits).
We find Claude, in March of 1650, present at the White Horse Inn
(Hotel du Cheval Blanc), situated on the road leading to Rouperoux,
attending a conference being given by Monsieur Giffard who was looking
for volunteers to emigrate to New France. Claude, and a friend named
Julien Fortin, volunteered to go. They put their affairs in order and
sometime after embarked for New France. It is recorded in a certain
Jesuit journal that Monsieur Giffard's vessel arrived on the 14th of
July, but does not give the year. It may have been 1650, but then some
believe it was 1652. In any event, a sizeable group of Bouchards were
present at the White Horse Inn, in Saint-Cosme-de-Vair in 1952, to
unveil a plaque commemorating the 300th anniversary of the departure
of their ancestor Claude Bouchard for New France. I nonetheless accept
as fact that Claude arrived in New France on July 14, 1650, because of
other dates one comes accross in the telling of his story.
Upon arriving, Claude and his friend Julien went to the seigneury de
Beauport (situated between where Quebec stands today and the Mount
Morency Falls to the north) to secure food and lodging. It appears
that Claude had come with some funds of his own (being his father's
heir as well as an accomplished tailor) and had come to New France not
as an indentured servant but rather under the protection of Monsieur
Giffard with some freedom to travel, which he did. We next find him,
on October 26, 1650, in the office of Oliver Letardif, agent for the
seigneurie de Beaupre, for the purpose of buying a tract of land with
one fifth of a mile fronting on the river and about five miles deep
into the interior. This tract was located about three miles northeast
of where the church of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre stands today. Three
years later, on October 1, 1653, Claude wanted to sell this tract to a
Louis Guimond, but the sale was not approved (as it had to be, by the
royal charter company) until October 1, 1657, for which he received
600 livres, a fair sum in its day, which amounted to approximately
$1,200 in 1968 Canadian currency. 
Bouchard, Claude (I16414)
 
22 "Likes playing cards and camping"
DANSVILLE - Reid G. Weidman, 77, of Jefferson Street, Dansville,
passed away unexpectedly Thursday (Dec. 29, 2005) at Rochester General
Hospital.
He was born in the Town of Ossian on April 3, 1928, a son of the late
Ray and Addie Linzy Weidman. On March 31, 1990, he was married to
Frances Allen Weidman, who survives. He also was predeceased by his
siblings, Hugh, John, Neal and Lynn Weidman, and Ruby Weidman Purdy.
Reid had worked on the family farm in Ossian, and the former Blum Shoe
Factory in Dansville. He retired from Delco Products in Rochester as a
set up man on Nov. 30, 1983, after 28 years of service. After
retirement, he drove school bus for the Dansville Central School for
over 20 years. He honorably served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1955
at Ft. Monmouth, N.J.
He was a 50-year member of the James H. Jackson Hose Company of the
Dansville Volunteer Fire Department. He was a member of the Loyal
Order of the Moose #1130, the Powers' Inn Club, the Daniel Goho Post
#87 of the American Legion and a member of the United Methodist
Church, all of Dansville.
Surviving in addition to his dear wife, Fran, are a daughter, Dawn
(Rick) Lunt of Greece; two sons, Dennis (Patricia) Weidman of
Pennsylvania and Ronald (Beaty) Weidman of West Sparta; five stepsons,
Robert (Janice) Infantino and Charles (Katie) Infantino, both of
Dansville, Rick (Catherine) Infantino of Maryland, Steve Infantino and
Michael Infantino, both of Rochester; a stepdaughter, Kim (Patrick)
Parish of North Carolina; 15 grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren; a brother, Mark (Johanne) Weidman of Dansville;
three sisters, Lucy Isaman and Fern Weidman, both of Dansville, and
Mary (Gilbert) Womack of North Carolina; a sister-in-law, Marilyn
Weidman of Swain; many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.
Friends may call Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Hindle Funeral
Home, Inc., 271 Main St., Dansville. Services will take place at 11
a.m. Monday at the Dansville United Methodist Church, 5 Chestnut Ave.,
Dansville. Interment with full military honors will be in Greenmount
Cemetery, Dansville.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Dansville Ambulance
Fund, PO Box 235; Dansville Fire Department, PO Box 401; or the United
Methodist Church, 5 Chestnut Ave., all of Dansville, NY 14437. 
Weidman, Reid G. (I10271)
 
23 "lived in Earlville,NY" (Chenango/Madison Co.) Conrad, Reva (I12836)
 
24 "Lived in Homer, was a carpenter" Miller, Floyd (I3371)
 
25 "Lived near Addison" 1920 living in Corning,NY working in the Glass
Works 
Clark, Flynn B. (I12123)
 
26 "lived to be one hundred" Edwards, Edith (I9881)
 
27 "lives in Pennellville,NY" (Oswego Co.) Conrad, Durwood (I12835)
 
28 "Major Martin Cossit, a Revolutionary soldier, settled in the village in 1798. In March, 1799, the settlement of Thorn Hill was commenced by David Earll, Eleazer Burns, John Wiltsie, and Nathan Tanner, who came hither from Washington county on sleighs drawn by horse teams and oxen. Mr. Earll died upon his original farm and was succeeded by his son, William, who, upon his death, was followed by his son, Shepard. This is one of the very few instances in Marcellus of perpetuity of title and actual residence. Thorn Hill, situated in the southwest corner of the town, was named from Obadiah Thorn, a later comer, who was instrumental in establishing the post-office and mail route, and who was for many years a highly respected citizen and widely known as an extensive wool buyer. He subsequently removed to the Baldwin farm, near Skaneateles." Burns, Hannah (I18785)
 
29 "Marion M. Walker" on death certificate Walker, Mary Jane (I8875)
 
30 "Martin Irving Hartman, 82, of Reeds Corners Road, Sparta, died Monday
(Aug. 31, 1987) at Noyes Memorial Hospital.
A life resident of Sparta and the son of Edgar and May Parker Hartman,
he owned and operated the Hartman Farm until retiring several years
ago.
Mr. Hartman was an active member of the Sparta United Methodist
Church, a 60-year member of the Sparta Grange and a member of the
Sixty Plus or Minus Club. He was active with the Dansville Meals on
Wheels program since its formation.
Survivors include his wife, Arla Gilmer Hartman; a son, David of
Fairport; a daughter, Ruth Beccue of LeRoy; two stepsons, Lee Holbert
of South Haven, Mich., Ronald Holbert of Livonia; three stepdaughters,
Elaine Hall of Dansville, Helen Brooks of Fairport, Beverly Hart of
Macedon; 23 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews.
A funeral service was conducted Wednesday at the Chamberlin Funeral
Home. Burial was in Oak Lawn Cemetery, West Sparta.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Sparta United Methodist
Church." (GCE, September 3, 1987, p4)
Martin and Adeline adopted James Martin Hartman, 04Aug1940; they
adopted David Edgar Hartman, 16Oct1943. 
Hartman, Martin Irving (I4972)
 
31 "Mary Jane Walker" on birth certificate Walker, Mary Jane (I8875)
 
32 "Mary, wife of John Stalee; Died Jan. 4, 1843; Aged 86 years, 6 mo., 11 days" I would have to assume that the inscription might have been 80 years instead of 86, if it is 86, then she would have been born 1756, and have been 24 at the time of the capture at Fort Plank, not 17 as was written, also her parents were not George Jr., but George Sr.????? House, Maria Elizabeth (I163)
 
33 "Master Mariner" said to have been Commander of the "Bark Fruiter" at
aged 45 years. 
Burditt, Captain Andrew Jr. (I8227)
 
34 "Millard Fillmore Sickly, of the town of Groveland died last Sunday after a lingering illness at the age of seventy-five years at his home near Maple Beach. Mr.Sickly was a farmer by occuaption and his life was spent on the farm. He was born in Groveland, but went to Kansas in 1880, returning fourteen years ago(1913). While in Kansas he lived for a while at Iola, Allen Co. and held the office of treasurer for four years. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Anna L. Sickly, three sons, Dumont of Moran,Kansas, Clyde of Groveland, and Glenn of Detroit,Michigan, and a daughter, Bertha(Mrs. E. J. Bondy) of Kansas City, Mo. The body was taken to LaHarpe,Kas. where he conducted a farm during a part of his residence in that state. Mr. Sickly is spoken of as a good neighbor and a man of high ideals and the best principles"(obit.) Sickly, Millard Filmore (I13150)
 
35 "Mrs. Caroline Hartman, wife of George Hartman, died at the family
home at the lower end of Main Street Saturday afternoon. She had been
sick for some time, and as Mr. Hartman had also been ill for a time,
the care of the two aged people had devolved upon the daughter Miss
Mary Hartman, who gave the closest attention to the sick ones until a
nurse was called in to assist. Mrs. Hartman was the daughter of
Bernard Hamsher of Sparta and she was born in the house on the Magin
farm near the Lackawanna depot which was removed when Mr.Magin built
his present residence, Dec. 5, 1824, so the she was a little more than
88 years at the time of her death. She married to Mr. Hartman Oct..
18, 1854, by Rev. David Lantz, and she had lived in the home where she
died nearly al lher married life. She was beautiful in her younger
days and as the years advanced she developed into a noble woman,
beloved not alone by her family but by her acquaintances and friends.
As a mother she had no superior and as a friend to the afflicted and
the poor she was ever ready to give of her sympathy and her means,
counting it always more blessed to give than to receive. While at her
home in Sparta as a girl she was a leader in musical circles, having a
voice of rare sweetness and volume, and until she left her own home to
build up another for her husband and children she was a member of the
choir of St.John's Lutheran church at the center. Mrs. Hartman is
survived by her husband, her daughter, Miss Mary Hartman and two sons,
Frank M. Hartman and Albert W. Hartman. Funeral services were held
from the house on Tuesday, Rev. M. R. Heilig of St. Paul's English
Lutheran church officiating, and she was buried on the family lot in
Greenmount."[CI:242:?4:CI] 
Hamsher, Caroline Elizabeth (I7857)
 
36 "Mrs. Edna Hulbert, of Canaseraga,NY" 1960. Stewart, Edna V. (I10414)
 
37 "My Uncle Alex St. Laurent and his brother Joseph (my grandfather)
settled in Bay City Michigan. Uncle Alex opened a General store on 3rd
and Waters and in 1904 they jointly opened St. Laurent Bros. The store
has a web site, however the second generation of brothers (my father
and uncles) sold the store in 1985. I was there yesterday and the
store is just the same as it has always been!
Joseph married Estella Brown and they had 6 boys and 1 girl. Estella
died 1 month after her last son was born, complications of childbirth.
Grandpa Joe died of complications from diabeties (rampant in his
family). Joseph and Estella had 30 grandchildren.
Alex and Ruth may have had a child that died in childbirth, but had no
surviving children. Uncle Alex died before I was born. I remember Aunt
Ruth well though (always had good treats!), she had a stroke in the
mid 1960's and spent the remainder of her life in a nursing home, but
she always had a sharp mind and almost always remembered us.
Would be really interested in any info you may have! We've been
stuck!"
Jill D. 
St.Laurent, Joseph (I26482)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I12873)
 
39 "of Binghamton" Noyes, Thomas A. (I12874)
 
40 "of Cortland" Thomas, L. D. (I12842)
 
41 "of Cortland" Smith, Mr. (I12867)
 
42 "of Freetown" Carr, William (I12767)
 
43 "of Ithaca" Voorhees, Sharon (I12878)
 
44 "of Jamaica,L.I." Potter, Irving (I12843)
 
45 "of Lapeer,Cortland Co.,NY" Wheeler, Daniel (I12795)
 
46 "of Lapeer,Cortland Co.,NY" Haley, Lavader (I12823)
 
47 "of McGraw,NY" Fraser, Benjamin (I12857)
 
48 "of Syracuse & Homer" Cornish, James (I12859)
 
49 "of Tamarack Lodge, Texas Valley, New York" Miller, Edward B. (I12747)
 
50 "of Texas Valley" Carter, Mercena (I12850)
 

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