Johann Adam Stephan

Female 1750 - 1804  (54 years)


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  • Name Johann Adam Stephan 
    Born 8 Jul 1750  Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Military Service 1798  Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Fries's Rebellion
    (aka Direct House Tax of 1798) 
    • "Fries's Rebellion: The Enduring Struggle for the American Revolution" By Paul Douglas Newman.
      “The Fries Rebellion 1798-1799” By W.W.H.Davis, pp.51-66
      "John Fries Rebellion" By James R. Mann http://www.jamesmannartfarm.com/friesreb1.html

      Newman, p.105
      In January 1799 when two assessors came to his home of Revolutionary War veteran, wheat farmer, and successful miller, Herman Hartman. Hartman gave the two a similar welcome, explaining that "he had his gun ready," that he and his Macungie neighbors were prepared, and that if "forced" they would "cut off the heads of those Stampers." The two men then jotted Hartman's name down under Heverly's and determined to try one more house down the road.

      Newman, p.106
      Like tavernkeepers, millers such as Engelman and Herman Hartman assisted in coordinating resistance, as did families, preachers, militia captains, and associates. Farmers came to millers regularly to process their wheat and rye and Engelman and Hartman stored it for them and likely traded it at Allentown just a few miles away, where it began a journey down the Lehigh River past Easton, and down the Delaware to Philadelphia, and then on out to the national and international markets. Engelman and Hartman would have credited the farmers' deposits and then traded back to them flour for their bread, lumber for their homes, and barns, and some cash to purchase manufactured farm implements, leather goods, glass, clothing, and the like from local producers and the international markets. Millers were the center of the farmers' world. Who better to coordinate the opposition?

      Davis, pp.51-66
      Herman Hartman was arrested in Macungie on March 6 along with a few others and led them to Bethlehem. While there, John Fries heard of the arrests in Millerstown (Macungie) and with others made their way to Bethlehem to join Capt. Jarrett for a fight for the release of their neighbors. It was a very tense situation in Bethlehem and after some serious threats, the Judge and Marshall agreed that the prisoners be released to spare any bloodshed. Herman and the other went back to Northampton County. However, it was apparently short lived.

      Newman, p.154
      On March 20, two days after the meeting at Conrad Mark's tavern, "some of the most violent opposers of the law" from Millerstown, Macungie Township in (then) Northampton County - the center of the resistance- voluntarily surrendered themselves to authorities in Philadelphia. Herman Hartman, Adam Stephan, and Henry Shankweiler all delivered themselves peacefully to Judge Peters.

      The trial of John Fries and the others involved in the rebellion (including Herman Hartman) began April 11, 1799. However, after evidence was introduced of a juror guilty of prejudice a mistrial was declared in May 1799. Herman Hartman was asked to testify against the juror Rhodes, having heard after the juror was summoned saying that Fries should be hung. Rhodes of course denied this in court. The judge ended up calling for a new trail. The new trial began in October, after a yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia that summer. By May 1800 all trails had concluded with all but one of the 41 men in trial found guilty. Harman Hartman of Macungie was sentenced, May 2nd, to 6 months in prison and fine $150 ($3,000 today, 2018) for conspiracy, rescue and unlawful assembly. John Fries and two others were sentenced to be executed on May 23rd. However, two days before the execution President Adams pardoned the three and all other men who had been sentenced (including Herman Hartman).

      “Fries was the scapegoat of the times. Someone had to pay the price for this insurrection, and Fries was the man. This tax was unwarranted and there never was a war with France. The tax money was never returned to the people and it is not surprising that this whole area voted against Adams and for Jefferson.”- James R. Mann
    Died 2 Dec 1804  Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried St. Paul's Church OLD Cemetery, Trexlertown, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I43022  OurNorthernRoots
    Last Modified 8 Sep 2018 

    Father Johann Jacob Stephan,   b. 30 Nov 1695, Wolfersweiler, Saarland, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Maria Elisabetha Kohl,   b. 2 Aug 1699, Wolfersweiler, Saarland, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1759, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Married Abt 1749  Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F15572  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 8 Jul 1750 - Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary Service - Fries's Rebellion (aka Direct House Tax of 1798) - 1798 - Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 2 Dec 1804 - Macungie, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - St. Paul's Church OLD Cemetery, Trexlertown, Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth