Notes


Matches 5,951 to 6,000 of 6,481

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5951 Tax Records:
1802, 2 acres, Lower Makefield, $72 (Esther Mitchel)
1800, 2 acres, Lower Makefield, $62
1799, 2 acres, Lower Makefield, $62
1798, Mason, Lower Makefield, Trade $11
1797, Mason, Lower Makefield, $11
1796, Mason, Estate 8 acres, Lower Makefield, $105
1793, 48 acres, Lower Makefield, Value $187
1791, Mason, Lower Makefield - Value $45
1788, Mason, Bristol- Value $29
1786, Mason, 50 acres, Bristol -Value $177

 
Mitchel, Richard (I326)
 
5952 Taxed in 1798 Paul, Hannah (I14056)
 
5953 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I16659)
 
5954 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I16664)
 
5955 Teacher, Religious Education Director for St.Ann's Sharretts, Hildreth Mary (I31296)
 
5956 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3005)
 
5957 Ted V. Rauber, 50, passed away peacefully Sunday (Jan. 6, 2002) at his
home, after a long illness.
Ted was born Jan. 18, 1951 in Dansville, a son of Vincent (Vinnie) and
Grace (Keough) Rauber. He was a graduate of Dansville Central School;
he also attended Alfred State College and Monroe Community College.
Ted married Mary I. Shanley on Aug. 2, 1973, she survives. He was a
former employee at Coca-Cola Corp. for 20 years. He also worked at the
Maintenance Department at Noyes Memorial Hospital for six years, and
at the Ideal Lumber & Hardware in Dansville. His last employer was
Genesee Valley Motors in Avon, where he was a Business Link
Representative.
Ted was a communicant member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in
Dansville. He was also a former member of the Ossian Town Zoning
Board. Ted was an avid NASCAR fan. He twice completed the Fast Track
Driving School in Charlotte, N.C. He also enjoyed motorcycles, but
most of all he loved cars.
He is survived by his loving wife of 28 years, Mary; his daughter,
Erin Rauber of Avon; his son, Brian Rauber of Ossian; his mother,
Grace Rauber of Dansville; three sisters, Marge (Jim) Hartman of
Ontario, N.Y., Janice (Jim) Freeland of Hornell and Mary Hadley of
Ossian; his devoted brother, Steve (Diane) Rauber of Ossian and his
brother, Dan (Ann) Rauber of Dansville; his devoted cousin, Howard
(Robin) Gibson of Conover, N.C.; and many aunts, nieces, nephews,
cousins, special dear friends and neighbors.
Friends may call 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday at the Chamberlin-Baird
Funeral Home, 73 Main St., Dansville. A Memorial Mass of Christian
Burial will be held 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Mary's Catholic Church,
Dansville, with Father Steven Krause celebrating.
Contributions may be made to Noyes Memorial Hospital, Chemotherapy
Infusion Room, 111 Clara Barton St., Dansville, N.Y. 14437 or the
Livingston County Hospice, Livingston County Campus, Mt. Morris, N.Y.
14510, in memory of Ted V. Rauber. 
Rauber, Vincent (I18505)
 
5958 Telegrapher Deyo, Clarence Henry (I19697)
 
5959 Temperance married first about 1805 to Daniel Leek and removed to Hector,Schuyler Co.,NY about 1810. Daniel died about 1819 and Tempa is living in Hector as a widow in 1820. She married second 14Feb1827, Hon. John Dow of Reading,NY. John was the first settler of the Schuyler County area in 1789. John was also County Judge and Representative to Legislative; he wrote a pamphlet autobiography, which is included in the History of Tioga,Chemung,Tompkins and Scuyler Counties.,New York; 1884. After the death of Judge Dow in 1852, Temperance lived with her daughter, Anna Maria Sheperd, of Reading Center,NY. She died in 1866 and is buried in the Reading Center Burial Grounds.((she had two other children with Daniel)) Corwithe, Temperance (I140)
 
5960 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I26990)
 
5961 The 1860 census of Conesus list Reuben Hartman as a farmer with a real estate value of $2,000 and personal property value of $500. "In 1861 Reuben Hartman and his wife moved onto the Billy Brown farm at Mt. Pleasant and lived there the rest of their lives"(Moose) 1870 census of Springwater, Reuben and Susanna Hartman(with children Martha C. and Aaron F. Hartman); real estate value $6,500, and personal property value $1,270. Hartman, Reuben (I2879)
 
5962 The 1875 census shows her name as "Kittie E." At the time of her mothers death in 1894, Katherine was "one of the contributors to the Buffalo Evening News." As well as in 1898 at the time of her fathers death. Hartman, Katherine E. (I11167)
 
5963 The 1875 census shows this Jacob as Jacob Lander Jr. Lander, John Jacob (I5232)
 
5964 The 1880 census listed his as "Idiotic" Goodno, Scott W. (I12377)
 
5965 The Angelica Advocate

MRS.ELIZABETH O. MORTON, Well Known Teacher Passes Away

April 24, 1947

Mrs. Elizabeth Ostrander Morton, well known Allegany County teacher for many years died yesterday morning in Jones Memorial Hospital, Wellsville, following a brief illness.

Mrs. Morton taught in the high schools of Almond, Belmont, Owego, Wellsville and Bradford, Pa.

She graduated from Alfred University as president of her class in 1892 and received her Master?s degree from Alfred. Mrs. Morton studied for a year in Germany.

Mrs. Morton was active in community affairs here. She was Superintendent of Education of the Allegany County Fair Association, Angelica School director, president of the Angelica Progress Club, member of the Allegany County Garden Club, Past Regent of the Catherine Schuyler chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and Eighth District Director of the New York State Federation of women?s Clubs. She was also a member of the Angelica Methodist Church.

Deceased was born in Ionia, Michigan, May 2, 1869, a daughter of William and Jeanette Allen Ostrander. She was married to Frank Morton in 1929. Mr. Morton was a dairyman and connected with the State Department of Agriculture and the division of Bovine Tuberculosis Control until his death in 1943.

Surviving Mrs. Morton are a nephew, George W. Ostrander and a great nephew, George K. Ostrander, both of Niagara Falls; and cousins, S. H. Ostrander, Olean; A. J. Halsey, Buffalo, Mrs. Jessie Braedon, Angelica, and Mrs. Myrtle Scott, Cuba.

Funeral services will be held at the late home here Friday at 2 P.M. with the Rev. Carlyle Smith officiating. Burial will be in Woodlawn Cemetery, Almond.
 
Ostrander, Elizabeth (I11853)
 
5966 The Angelica Advocate, April 5, 1945
FARNUM - WICKWIRE
At an early spring wedding, Thursday evening, March 29, Hazel Irene Wickwire, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Wickwire of Belmont, became the bride of Pvt. Luther C. Farnum, son of Mrs. Grace Farnum and the late Gordon Farnum of Angelica. The wedding was solemnized in St. Paul's Episcopal Church by Rev. Roy L. Webber. Easter Lilies and pink and white snapdragons formed the setting. Mrs. Ray Lyon of Belvidere played the wedding music. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a street length gown of beige with brown accessories. Her corsage was of Easter lilies and white snapdragons. The maid of honor was the bride's sister, Miss Edna Wickwire. She wore a gold colored gown with brown accessories. Her corsage was of pink carnations and pink snapdragons. Harland Palmer of Angelica attended the groom. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of Mrs. Grace Farnum. Pvt. Farnum left Monday, for Camp Meade, Maryland. 
Family F3561
 
5967 The area of the Palatinate where the Anabaptist Oberholtzers lived is today known as the Kraichgau. This region was depopulated during the Thirty Years War. The Oberholtzers and other foreign families were needed in the area by landlords who sought to rebuild their manors and estates. In exchange, they were given some religious toleration. Consequently, the majority of the Anabaptists emigrated from Zurich, whose officials had resorted to execution, imprisonment, confiscation of property, and any other means of cruelty, in hopes of banishing them.

The Geneallandearchiv, Karlsruhe, gives this quote from the seventeenth century: "A number of the Wiedertauffer wish to settle here, which people practice their religious exercises partly in the forest, partly in their houses, and some have their land on the church support land. Many adapt well, among them is Marx Oberholtzer, who announced that he plans to marry his brother's servant, but does not intend to have his marriage announced publicly."

Marx Oberholtzer was among a group of 53 Anabaptists meeting for worship near Sinsheim on the evening of March 2, 1661. While they were singing, the meeting was abruptly ended by German authorities. Their names were taken, which included other familiar Pennsylvania names such as Groff, Hess, Landis, Meyer and Miller. They were to report for punishment on March 29th. Appearing on that date, they stated that they had come into the country from Switzerland in 1655 and had been meeting for worship secretly in the forests near Steinsfurt. The government fined them but they continued to meet. In 1662, Elector Karl Ludwig ordered that the Mennonists should no longer be forbidden to meet, but that every participant must pay a tax. Warfare, economic difficulties and religious suppression would later entice members of the Oberholtzer family to America. The Anabaptists in the Palatinate became known as Mennonists, for a group of Holland Anabaptists who took the name from an early leader, Menno Simons. 
Oberholtzer, Marcus (I38974)
 
5968 The article from which the following statement is compiled was written by Miss Caroline Whiting, of Norwood, Mass., from information that she obtained from Joel Talbot, Esq., of Stoughton, and the Misses Anna and Catherine Talbot, of Norwood, and printed in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register for April, 1855.

"Peter Talbot was born in Lancashire, England, and while a youth, at a boarding school in Edinburgh, he, with two other of his fellow students, were seized one day, while out in a boat, by a press-gang and taken on board a man of war, bound for the American coast. When near Rhode Island, he escaped from the vessel in the night, and by swimming reached the main land in safety, leaving on board his more timid companions, who had tried to dissuade him from so rash an undertaking. From his place of landing, he travelled northerly, and after a journey of some days, arrived in Dorchester, where he considered himself safe from pursuit. Here by industry and frugality he secured the means to return home, never intending to settle in New England. He paid his passage and took his effects on board, himself staying on shore during a storm, which detained the vessel from sailing. The weather having cleared, the vessel sailed early in the morning, leaving him behind, but taking his effects, and he losing his hard earned passage money.

He bore his misfortune with courage, and soon after married. Again he made preparations to return to England, this time taking a wife with him, but strange though it may seem, from the same cause as before, the vessel sailed without them, again depriving him of all his property. Hearing afterward that the vessel with all on board was lost, he concluded that it was intended that he should remain in New England, and made no further attempt to return home.

Some years after his mariage he removed to Chelmsford, Mass. During his residence in Chelmsford, while he and hs eldest son were absent, the Indians came to his home, seized his wife, and carried her away with them, first killing her infant child. the Indians were pursued by the town's people, and Mrs. Talbot was soon rescued and returned to her home. Her children, Sarah and George, and probably Elizabeth, were out of doors together, when the Indians appeared and safely hid themselves in a ledge of rocks, not far away from the house.

The eldest son was killed while fighting the Indians, either at this time or at a later period. After these disasters, the family returned to Dorchester and made it their future home. It is supposed that he died about 1704; his widow, surviving him, lived with her son George, in that part of Dorchester now Stoughton, probably at the original homestead. Sarah, his daughter, married, but to whom it is not known, and Elizabeth Talbot, who was probably another daughter, married Eleazer Puffer."

The genealogical part of the article is found, after careful investigations, not to be absolutely correct, and has not been copied.

The only events relating to Peter Talbot, contained in the family record of his son George, and thus preserved, are, that he was "born in Lancashire old England" and that he "died about 1704." This is from my father's copy; but happily there are other sources of information, from which we are able to follow him during a great part of his life, after he settled in Dorchester. How early he arrived in this town is not known, but the first date we have is 1675, when he is found on the Dorchester tax list. He was in the military service before October 14, 1677, for on that date his military account is made up by the province treasurer, showing the amount due him to be 18 pounds, 16 shillings, 08. In 1679 he removed to Milton, where he remained until 1684, if not later, he being taxed there in a rate made in January of that year. December 14, 1686, he was one of fifty persons who bought a large tract of land in that part of Chelmsford which has since become the city of Lowell. Two years later he sold his undivided interest in this land, but retained a home lot that had been set off to him. He remained in Chelmsford until after March 16, 1691-92, for at that date he was on the rolls of the west regiment of Middlesex; but soon after, returned to Milton, where he was taxed in 1693 and 1694.

The latest date that has been found relating to him, is May 4, 1704, when with his wife Hannah, calling themselves of Boston, they sold six acres of land in Chelmsford. His son George was a witness to the deed. It is probably a hundred years since Richard Talbot made this entry in his family record, relating to his great-grandfather, "died about 1704," and it was his belief, that about that time he undertook to make a visit to England, and not being heard from afterward, was supposed to have been lost at sea, or to have died soon after his arrival there. At any rate no positive evidence has been found as to his decease.

The sale of land in Chelmsford in the early part of 1704, a circumstance of which those who fix the time of his death would not be likely to have had any knowledge, adds to the probability that the date of his voyage to England, if he made one, is correct.

Peter Talbot was married to his first wife, Mary WADEL, by Gov. Dudley, in Dorchester, January 12, 1677-8. With much time and research Mary Wadel has been completely identified, but the date of her birth, the names of her parents, and their residence has not been found. Mary GOOLE married, in Chelmsford, December 25, 1666, John WADEL, whose alias was WATTEL. He died before June 6, 1676, that being the date when the inventory of his estate was taken. In this inventory the appraisers returned "one bed and furniture to it, and one cow," prized at Dorchester, and valued at five pounds. His whole estate was valued at 38 pounds, 9 shillings, 6. It seems to be clear that at this date, his widow, for some reason, was living in Dorchester. He left three children who lived to grow up and marry. Their names were William, Mary, and Rose, and they, in 1710, made sale of their father's real estate in Chelmsford. At this date, 1710, Mary was living in Woburn, Mass., Rose in Preston, Conn., and William in Lebanon, Conn., which at the same time was the home of Dorothy Talbot, wife of James Cutting, daughter of Peter and Mary (Wadel) Talbot. Mr. Cutting in his will, made in 1746, appoints William Wattel, his friend, one of his executors. These facts, I think, are conclusive, that the first wife of Peter Talbot was the widow of John Wadel, and they also make doubtful the story that they made arrangements to return to England soon after their marriage, as the number of their family would seem to be a hindrance to such a procedure.

Mrs. Talbot died in Chelmsford, August 29, 1687, and on the same day John Fisk and Susanna, widow of George Byam, also died. Three deaths in one day, out of population so small as was that of Chelmsford when these deaths took place, must have been exceptionable; but it is not found that they were from other than natural causes, and the Indian raid and massacre as stated in the "tradition," has not been found to be related to these deaths. Peter Talbot married, December 29, 1687, for his second wife, Hannah Clarke, of Concord, widow of William Frizzell, to whom she was married November 28, 1667, and whose death occurred in Concord, January 25, 1684-5. Elizabeth Frizzell, their daughter, undoubtedly lived with her mother, as she was admitted to the Milton Church, August 11, 1700. No attempt has been made to follow the history of the other children of Frizzell. The ages of both these wives, judging by the dates of their first marriages, would indicate that the second husband, Peter Talbot, had been some time in this country before his marriage, or that he was older, when he arrived, than the "Tradition," would make him. The date of his death has been previously considered, but nothing has been found to fix that of his second wife.

- the above is from p. 7-9, "Talbot Genealogy" by Hon. Newton Talbot (Boston, 1895).1
 
Talbott, George Jr. (I510)
 
5969 THE AYLMER EXPRESSS MARCH 1, 1934
AN OLD RESIDENT, MALAHIDE 
Staley, Samuel (I24306)
 
5970 The baptism record for Gershom was found in the Register at the village of Eccles, near Banham, Norfolk, England. The record reads as follows: "Gersham Wheelocke filius Radolphi Wheelocke baptisatus fuit 3 die Jan:1632/33". (Source: "Mr. Wheelock's Cure", by Christopher Gleason Clark, published in the July 1998 issue of New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol 152.) William S. Tilden, "History of Medfield, Massachusetts, 1650-1886", 1886, writes the following about Gershom: "Gershom was in the list for Mr. Wilson's rate in 1657 [1], and probably came of age about that time. He married Hannah Stodder, daughter of John of Hingham, in 1658. In 1663, he had liberty from the town to cut "200 sedar plank" in the common swamp. His house stood on the Harbor Island road, a short distance south-west of the present residence of Charles Hamant. He rung the bell and swept the meeting-house in 1674, for which the town paid him 2 pounds, 15 shillings. The next year, he assisted in thatching the meeting-house. His house was burned by the Indians in 1676, and it appears to have been rebuilt on the same spot [2]. He died in 1684, and in 1690 his heirs sold the homestead to Joseph Plimpton."
Note [1]: Mr Wilson was the first minister in Medfield.
Note [2]: King Philips War. 
Wheelock, Gershom (I14216)
 
5971 The book, "The Settlers of the Beekman Patent," vol.2, by Frank J. Doherty, 1993, mentions several Allen families from the Pawling area of Dutchess County, as well as the Chase family. The George Allen Jr. mentioned in the book is believed to be the father of George H., as this George Allen Jr. had a brother Weston, named after their mother's mother, Patience Weston. It's also possible that George H. is the son of Weston, but the book mentions some of his children, so I would tend to believe that George H. is a son of George Jr. that the author knows little about. Never-the-less I am certain George H. Allen, named above, is the grandson of George and Mary(daughter of John and Patience[Weston] Briggs) Allen, orginally of Dartmouth,MA left after 1736 and by February 1744 were living in Pawling,Dutchess Co.,NY. They had at least four children; Weston(b.1732), Anne(b.1734), Elizabeth(b.1736), and George(b.????). This Allen family is a descendants of George Allen(1568-1648) and his wife Catherine, who came from Weymouth,England to Boston,MA arriving 06May1635 and later settling in Sandwich,MA.

  • George H. Allen left Dutchess County about 1792 and moved to Northumberland, Saratoga Co., NY. He removed to Marcellas, Onondaga Co., NY in 1801. His eldest daughter, Bestey is said to have remained in Saratoga County where she had gotten married(she is NOT the Betsey Allen who married Selby Caulkins, of Saratoga County). George's son John and Weston remained in the Onondaga County area, Weston settling in Lysander. The rest of the Allen's eventually all moved to Allegany County between 1823 and 1824/5. George's son Dewitt Clinton is from his second wife Elizabeth Wightman.

  • Land record(Book ZZ, page 336) for his wife Betsey shows that they were still 'of Skaneatles,NY' as of Jun 1833.

  • Allen Family Reunions:
    1896 - Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Phillips, McHenry Valley
    1897 - Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Moss, Whitney Valley
    1898 - Mr. and Mrs. William Orstrander, Almond
    1899 - Mr. and Mrs. James Hoard, Alfred
    1900 - Island Park, Wellsville (Hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen and Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Halsey)
    1901 - Charles Allen farm
    1902 - Mr. and Mrs. Fred Halsey
    1903 - Mr. and Mrs. Frank Morton, West Almond
    1904 - Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Phillips
    1905 - Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Sisson
    1906 - Island Park, Wellsville
    1907 - Mrs. Mary Tucker and sons
    1908 - Mr. and Mrs. Harry Allen
    1909 - Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Wright, Scio
    1910 - Riley Allen, Allentown
    1911 - Mr. and Mrs. Holly, Ceres
    1912 - Island Park, Wellsville
    1913 - Island Park, Wellsville
    1914 - Alfred 
  • Allen, George H. (I113)
     
    5972 The Brooklyn (IA) Chronicle
    Sept. 11, 1996
    VALETTA M. FOWLER
    Mrs. Valetta M. Fowler, 92, of Brooklyn, died early Tuesday morning, Sept. 3, 1996, in Grinnell Regional Medical Center, Grinnell.
    Funeral services for Mrs. Fowler were held at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, Sepat.5 , in the Grace United Methodist Church, Brooklyn. Rev. William Daylong officiated. The organist was Mrs. Anita Ormiston and congregational hymns were "Amazing Grace" and "Just A Closer Walk With Thee." Angie Van Cleave Lundvall presented a "Grandmother's Tribute.". Interment was in Brooklyn Memorial Cemetery. The Nevenhoven Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
    Valetta Mae Murdock Fowler, daughter of Alex Murdock and Isabelle Milling Murdock, was born April 8, 1904, at Ewart, Iowa. She moved with her family to Brooklyn at the age of 9 years. Mrs. Fowler graduated by correspondence from Brooklyn High School with the class of 1923.
    On October 12, 1921, she was married to Frederick Fowler in the Methodist parsonage in Brooklyn. They farmed north of Brooklyn for 25 years. During World War II they lived in the Quad Cities. After they operated a Phillips 66 station in Tama, they returned to Brooklyn in 1949. Mrs. Fowler worked at REC for five years, owned and operated the Ben Franklin Store in Brooklyn, and later worked for Wes Reida.
    Valetta was a member of the Grace United Methodist Church, Eastern Star, Kum-Joy-Nus, and adult Sunday School. She enjoyed painitng, poetry and baking, but most of all, her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
    She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Arlene and Louis Keiser of Brooklyn; three grandchildren, Mike Keiser of Brooklyn, Mary Van Cleave of Melbourne, and Nancy Keiser of Bryant; six great-grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren.
    She was preceded in death by her husband, who died April 13, 1966; one daughter, Vivian Moeller; one brother, Hugh Murdock; and three sisters, Margaret Milling, Lois McGivern and Ethyl Simmons.
    Source: http://iagenweb.org/boards/poweshiek/obituaries/  
    Murdock, Valetta Mae (I16816)
     
    5973 The Buffalo Courier
    Buffalo, Erie County, New York.
    Sunday, January 6, 1901

    Jacob Hamsher, a prominent farmer of East Hill, died on Thursday morning of cancer of the stomach, 67 years old. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon from the school house at that place. 
    Hamsher, Jacob W. (I5623)
     
    5974 The Call of Death

    Petty – Mrs. C.W. Petty of So. Boardman, Mich., died at her home there last Tuesday, Dec. 5th. The funeral services were held at So. Boardman after which the body was brought to this city, arriving this forenoon and interment was in the public cemetery beside her husband who died eleven years ago. Decedent was 64 years of age and had been ailing for some time. About three years after her husband's death, she removed with her family of three sons and one daughter to So. Boardman, where she has since resided. Two sons, Jay and Perry accompanied the body to this city and are guests today at the W.H. Petty home. Mrs. Petty was a daughter of Seth Summer, one of the earliest residents of Brillion and had a wide circle of friends here who deeply sympathize with the family in their sad bereavement.
    Brillion News – Fri., Dec. 8, 1911 
    Sumner, Martha Jane (I44157)
     
    5975 The Canaseraga Times Thursday, Jan 21,1875
    Marriages: Haynes-Glover
    In Hornellsville Dec 29th by Rev. George Sheerer, Mr. Israel Haynes and Miss Rebecca Glover, both of Grove 
    Family F11881
     
    5976 The Captain of a militia company, he suffered an accidental gunshot wound while drilling his company at Palmer's River, now within the limits of Rehoboth, Bristol, MA. His death is recorded in Rehoboth VR & in the Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, by James N. Arnold, citing the Providence Gazette. Wheeler, Deacon Philip (I32145)
     
    5977 The Clark Hendee in 1930 Brooklyn,NY working for Otis Elevator Hendee, Clark (I4334)
     
    5978 The Columbus Weekly Telegram, August 7, 1890
    HENRY--The remains of A. Henry was ___ped to Fremont yesterday for interment. The burial occurred in __ afternoon. Besides the relatives of the deceased, J.J. Sullivan, J.E. __th, G.B. Speice, Gus G. Becher, __ Anderson and Rev. Worley, followed the body from this city to its final resting place. 
    Henry, Andrew (I22867)
     
    5979 The Columbus Weekly Telegram, July 31, 1890
    HENRY--Yesterday at 10:40 a.m., Andrew Henry, father of R.H. Henry, mayor of Columbus, died at his home in this city. Mr. Henry had been ill only a short time, and his complaint was dysentery.
    Andrew Henry was born August 15, 1816, in Schuyler county, New York, consequently had he lived until the 15th of next month, he would have been 74 years old.
    He located in Columbus many years ago, and engaged in the lumber business. When he closed out his lumber yard here, he went to Omaha where he engaged in the banking business. While he spent the greater portion of his time in latter years in a, yet he always retained his residence in this city. At the time of his death he was president of the Bank of Omaha.
    He leaves a wife and one son, R.H. Henry of this city, to mourn his demise.
    The deceased was a man of strict integrity and marked business ability. He made a success of the battle of his life and leaves a snug fortune as a testimonial of his years of labor and judicious management.
    The funeral will be held in Fremont Thursday, it being the expressed desire of the deceased before his death, that he be laid along-side his son, John C. Henry, who is buried there and who died June 12, 1880.
    [...and...]
    At the residence of the deceased, the funeral services of A. Henry will be held at 12 o'clock noon, today. The religious ceremonies will be conducted by Rev. Worley, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church. Immediately after the short ceremony at the residence, the remains will be taken to the Union Pacific depot from whence it will be shipped on the 1 p.m. train to Fremont, for burial.

     
    Henry, Andrew (I22867)
     
    5980 The Crested Butte Cemetery was established in 1879 and is located
    about 1/2 mile northeast of the town of Crested Butte. 
    Hartman, Noyes W. (I3017)
     
    5981 The Dansville Express
    Dansville, Livingston County, New York.
    Thursday, August 24, 1922

    Thirty Years Ago This Week.

    Mrs. Susan Dippy died last Thursday at her home on Church street aged 92 years. Her maiden name was Susan Fleck the widow of Abram Dippy, a soldier of the war of 1812. (Her son Geo. B. Dippy now lives on Church street, aged 87 years. One of Mrs. Dippy's sisters Mrs. Poor of Wayland died at the age of 94, another sister Mrs. Rebecca Hamsher died in Sparta aged 93 years, the mother of Jonas Hamsher of this town now about 91 years old.) 
    Flick, Susannah Barbara (I7814)
     
    5982 The Dansville Express
    Dansville, Livingston County, New York.
    Thursday, March 9, 1905

    George Hughes died at his home Feb. 27 after an illness of but three days, at the age of 70 years and one month. He bad been in his usual health when he wee taken with a sudden attack of stomach trouble, from which he never recovered, and his sudden death cast a gloom over the entire community. The funeral was held March 2d at one o'clock from the house and from the Canada Hill school-house at two. Rev. Seymour Moose officiating and the long line of friends who followed the remains to the cemetery showed the esteem in which he was held. Besides his wife he leaves an aged mother, Mrs Geo. Wagner of Reed's Corners and three sons, Jacob Hughes of Wayland, Frank and William Hughes of Sparta, and two sisters, Mrs. Jacob Hamsher and Mrs. Henry Dieter of Swainsville, one brother, Thomas Hughes of Dansville and two half brothers, Jacob and John Wagner of Reed's Corners to mourn his loss.

    The family of the late Geo. Hughes wish to publicly thank their friends and neighbors and all those who so kindly assisted them in any way during the illness and after the death of their father, and especially to the Carney Hollow choir for the beautiful selections rendered on that occasion, and to Mr. Peter Harvey for his kindness in bringing the choir.

    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hughes
    Hannah Hughes
     
    Hughes, George (I5619)
     
    5983 THE DANSVILLE EXPRESS (Dansville,Livingston Co., NY) USA
    11 July 1918: FRANK MEHLENBACHER - Frank Mehlenbacher one of the prominent and well-known residents of Dansville, died from a heart trouble Monday night, July 3, 1918, at the age of 66 years, having been born in the town of Wayland August 6, 1852, his father being Louis Mehlenbacher, a farmer who came from Germany. Mr.Mehlenbacher worked on a farm several years when young and he came here about forty years ago, purchasing the present residence of Mrs. B.C. Allen up Main street and keeping a grocery and hotel, later purchasing and keeping a hotel and bottling works near the D and M ____, now part of the Blum Shoe Mfg Co's plant, then after spending a year on a farm he opened the Farmers Home in 1893 where he lived until he died. In 1876, he married Elisabeth Weber in Dansville, and in 1891, both of them went to Germany to visit the homeland of their parents where they remained about a year. On his return, he developed some artistic taste and in his leisure hours he painted pictures of the old parental home in Germany and the farm home in this section where he spent his younger days. Mr. Mehlenbacher was over six feet tall and he weighed most of his life fully three hundred pounds, and when acting as drum major for the band, which he did on several occasions at home and out of town, he usually received the most attention. He was a powerful man as well as a large one, and for a number of years he was appointed a policeman by the village trustees, and he generally kept peace and quietness in his vicinity. He was a member of the German Lutheran church, was its treasurer for many years, and often represented the church in the yearly meetings of Synod. He was a good citizen, and he had many friends here and in the surrounding country. He is survived by his wife and a sister and a brother, Mrs. Geo. B. Dippy and Conrad Mehlenbacher. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2:00 at the house,Rev. Mr. Knox will officiate, burial in the family lot in the Perkinsville cemetery.
     
    Mehlenbacher, Frank (I33733)
     
    5984 The Dansville Express, dated 22 March 1923, had the following regarding the death of Areo, "Death of Areo Hartman --- The Death of Areo Hartman at his home in West Sparta last Friday removes a well known farmer and good citizen. He was born in the town 72 years ago, his father being Harmon Hartman(Harmon is not Areo's father, this is apparently a misprint from the Newpaper) who died some years ago, and he leaves his wife and a son Floyd Hartman. Mr. Hartman was always actively engaged in farming until some time ago when he was stricken with paralysis. His funeral was held Monday afternoon, interment in the West Sparta M. E. cemetery north of Byersville." Hartman, Areo Valevesca (I8581)
     
    5985 The Dansville Express, Thursday Feb. 9, 1882. Obituary of Mrs.
    Philemon Applin: "Mrs. Philemon Applin died Sunday Jan 29th. and was
    buried on Tuesday, services at the Sparta Presbyterian church. The
    deceased was 65 years old and was the oldest daughter of Samuel and
    Mary Hunt. A home where mother was always found to welcome is thus
    left desolate to her children, in whose welfare she always took the
    greatest interest and by whom she will be sadly missed. Her death was
    sudden and unexpected to her friends, to whom she will leave sad but
    sacred remembrance." 
    Hunt, Denise Mariah (I16154)
     
    5986 The daughter of Paul and Mehetable Sawyer who were both born at Lancaster, MA. She married Gardner Meloon at Boston on May 30, 1824. Gardner died of brain fever at age 31 on March 21, 1826, the couple having no children.
    Julia was the matron, or superintendent of the Female Orphan Asylum, located at 750 Washington St., Boston from about 1840. The asylum, which opened in 1803, housed 91 girls ages 3 to 16 with a live in staff of five according to the 1850 census and in 1860 75 girls between the ages of 4 and 16, employing two teachers, a cook, a seamstress, and chamber maid.
    Julia was 64 years, six months, and 25 days old when she died at the asylum due to Apoplexy. Her funeral was held there on Wednesday, April 29, 1863 at 11 a.m.

  • Julia gave in Sept 1850 deposition for her step-mother regarding her father's Revolutionary War service for her step mother to receive a widow's pension.  
  • Sawyer, Julia (I46197)
     
    5987 The Day, New London Conn., Tuesday April 30 1985
    Old Saybrook - Francis Edward Elliott, 56, of Old Saybrook, died Thursday at Middlesex Memorial Hospital, Middletown. Mr.Elliott was employed at Electric Boat and was a freelance photographer, winning numerous prizes and awards. He was educated at New York Institute of Photography and was a member of the Audubon Society; Local 614, Boilermakers Union, and the First Church of Christ n Saybrook, Congregational. Born March 29, 2929, in Birdsall, NY, he was the son of Homer and May Lockwood Elliott. Survivors include his wife, Adele Clarke Elliott; a son, Jeremiah Elliott of Old Saybrook; two brothers, James of Old Saybrook and Arthur Elliott of Essex; and three sisters, Eva Grusendorf of Pownal, Vt, Susan Proctor of California and Bernice Wakfield of New York. Funeral services will be at 7 pm tonight at the First Church if Christ in Saybrook, Congregational. Donations may be made in his memory of the bell Choir or the Deacon Fund of the church. 
    Elliott, Francis Edward (I9346)
     
    5988 The de Clares were one of the great baronial families of twelfth- and thirteenth-century England, holding wide estates in eastern and western England and beyond. For a while the senior branch, based at Tonbridge (Kent), was eclipsed in fame and fortune by a brilliant junior branch which established itself in South Wales and the Marches. Richard FitzGilbert de Clare of this branch, known to history as ‘Strongbow’, was the leader of the semi-official Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in Henry II’s reign and obtained a grant of the lordship of Leinster from the king in 1171. This cadet branch became extinct in the male line on the death of Strongbow’s son Gilbert in 1185 and the family’s estates were later taken over by the Marshal earls of Pembroke.
    Richard de Clare, appointed to the Twenty Five, of the senior branch of the family, was the son of Roger de Clare (d. 1173), lord of Tonbridge, who was in turn the younger brother and successor of Gilbert II (d. 1152), to whom King Stephen had granted the title earl of Hertford in or around 1138. In the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries the earls used the title ‘of Hertford’ interchangeably with that of earl of Clare.
    For over four decades until his death in 1217 Earl Richard was the effective head of the house of Clare. He does not appear to have been especially active, however, playing little part in national affairs either in the last years of Henry II’s reign or in that of Richard the Lionheart. He only emerged as a figure of political importance towards the end of his life in the crisis of John’s reign, when he was appointed to the Twenty Five, most probably in recognition less of his personal qualities than of his family’s exalted standing in the realm.
    Earl Richard’s greatest and most lasting achievement was to add to the already considerable wealth and landed endowment of his line. In 1189 at the beginning of Richard’s reign, in a major acquisition, he received a grant of half of the honor (or feudal lordship) of the Giffard earls of Buckingham, which had escheated to the crown over twenty years before, following the death of the last earl, Walter. The Lionheart effected an equal division between Earl Richard and his cousin Isabel, daughter of Strongbow and wife of William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, both of whom claimed descent from Roesia, Walter’s aunt and wife of Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, first founder of the family.
    In 1195 Earl Richard made another substantial, though less perhaps important, addition to his family’s inheritance when he obtained the feudal honor of St Hilary on the death of his mother Maud, Earl Roger’s widow. The honor, for which Richard offered £360 to the Crown, included lands in Norfolk and Northamptonshire.
    The most substantial of all the additions Earl Richard made to the family estate, however, came as a result of his marriage to Amicia, second daughter and eventual sole heiress of William, earl of Gloucester. The Gloucester inheritance was a vast one, comprising over 260 knights’ fees in England and extensive lands in Wales and the Marches. The story of its partition among the three daughters and co-heiresses is a long and complex one. Mabel, the eldest of the three, was married to Amaury de Montfort, count of Evreux in Normandy, while Isabel, the third and youngest, was married to the future King John. Mabel’s marriage was childless and on her husband’s death her lands passed to Isabel. John, however, on becoming king, divorced Isabel so that he could marry the Poitevin heiress Isabella of Angouleme, giving his now ex-wife in marriage to Geoffrey de Mandeville, another of the Twenty Five, and charging him 20,000 marks for the privilege. After Geoffrey died in 1216 her hand was taken by a third husband, Hubert de Burgh, but she herself died in 1217, and her estates passed to Amicia and her husband, Earl Richard. Earl Richard survived Isabel by only six weeks and did not live to secure formal possession of her estates and title. It was left to his son and heir Gilbert, another of the Twenty Five, to succeed to the vast Gloucester inheritance. Shortly after his father’s death Gilbert assumed the combined titles of earl of Gloucester and Hertford. Countess Amicia lived out her last years in retirement, probably at Clare, having been separated from her husband, for reasons unknown, since 1200.
    Earl Gilbert was an active participant on the baronial side in the civil war that followed in the wake of King John’s rejection of Magna Carta. He fought with Louis and the French at the battle of Lincoln in May 1217 and was taken captive by none other than William Marshal, the Regent, whose daughter, Isabel, he was later to marry. In 1225 he was a witness to Henry III’s definitive reissue of Magna Carta. In 1230 he accompanied Henry on his expedition to Brittany, but died on the way back at Penros, in the duchy. The earl’s body was brought by way of Plymouth to Tewkesbury, where he was buried before the high altar of the great abbey. A monument, now lost, was erected to his memory by his widow.
    By a strange irony, the de Clare family, in the manner of their predecessors in the Gloucester title, was to come to an end in 1314, after the death of the last earl, in the succession of three daughters and coheiresses and the partition of the family estates between them. 
    de Clare, Richard (I9660)
     
    5989 The de Clares were one of the great baronial families of twelfth- and thirteenth-century England, holding wide estates in eastern and western England and beyond. For a while the senior branch, based at Tonbridge (Kent), was eclipsed in fame and fortune by a brilliant junior branch which established itself in South Wales and the Marches. Richard FitzGilbert de Clare of this branch, known to history as ‘Strongbow’, was the leader of the semi-official Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in Henry II’s reign and obtained a grant of the lordship of Leinster from the king in 1171. This cadet branch became extinct in the male line on the death of Strongbow’s son Gilbert in 1185 and the family’s estates were later taken over by the Marshal earls of Pembroke.
    Richard de Clare, appointed to the Twenty Five, of the senior branch of the family, was the son of Roger de Clare (d. 1173), lord of Tonbridge, who was in turn the younger brother and successor of Gilbert II (d. 1152), to whom King Stephen had granted the title earl of Hertford in or around 1138. In the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries the earls used the title ‘of Hertford’ interchangeably with that of earl of Clare.
    For over four decades until his death in 1217 Earl Richard was the effective head of the house of Clare. He does not appear to have been especially active, however, playing little part in national affairs either in the last years of Henry II’s reign or in that of Richard the Lionheart. He only emerged as a figure of political importance towards the end of his life in the crisis of John’s reign, when he was appointed to the Twenty Five, most probably in recognition less of his personal qualities than of his family’s exalted standing in the realm.
    Earl Richard’s greatest and most lasting achievement was to add to the already considerable wealth and landed endowment of his line. In 1189 at the beginning of Richard’s reign, in a major acquisition, he received a grant of half of the honor (or feudal lordship) of the Giffard earls of Buckingham, which had escheated to the crown over twenty years before, following the death of the last earl, Walter. The Lionheart effected an equal division between Earl Richard and his cousin Isabel, daughter of Strongbow and wife of William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, both of whom claimed descent from Roesia, Walter’s aunt and wife of Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, first founder of the family.
    In 1195 Earl Richard made another substantial, though less perhaps important, addition to his family’s inheritance when he obtained the feudal honor of St Hilary on the death of his mother Maud, Earl Roger’s widow. The honor, for which Richard offered £360 to the Crown, included lands in Norfolk and Northamptonshire.
    The most substantial of all the additions Earl Richard made to the family estate, however, came as a result of his marriage to Amicia, second daughter and eventual sole heiress of William, earl of Gloucester. The Gloucester inheritance was a vast one, comprising over 260 knights’ fees in England and extensive lands in Wales and the Marches. The story of its partition among the three daughters and co-heiresses is a long and complex one. Mabel, the eldest of the three, was married to Amaury de Montfort, count of Evreux in Normandy, while Isabel, the third and youngest, was married to the future King John. Mabel’s marriage was childless and on her husband’s death her lands passed to Isabel. John, however, on becoming king, divorced Isabel so that he could marry the Poitevin heiress Isabella of Angouleme, giving his now ex-wife in marriage to Geoffrey de Mandeville, another of the Twenty Five, and charging him 20,000 marks for the privilege. After Geoffrey died in 1216 her hand was taken by a third husband, Hubert de Burgh, but she herself died in 1217, and her estates passed to Amicia and her husband, Earl Richard. Earl Richard survived Isabel by only six weeks and did not live to secure formal possession of her estates and title. It was left to his son and heir Gilbert, another of the Twenty Five, to succeed to the vast Gloucester inheritance. Shortly after his father’s death Gilbert assumed the combined titles of earl of Gloucester and Hertford. Countess Amicia lived out her last years in retirement, probably at Clare, having been separated from her husband, for reasons unknown, since 1200.
    Earl Gilbert was an active participant on the baronial side in the civil war that followed in the wake of King John’s rejection of Magna Carta. He fought with Louis and the French at the battle of Lincoln in May 1217 and was taken captive by none other than William Marshal, the Regent, whose daughter, Isabel, he was later to marry. In 1225 he was a witness to Henry III’s definitive reissue of Magna Carta. In 1230 he accompanied Henry on his expedition to Brittany, but died on the way back at Penros, in the duchy. The earl’s body was brought by way of Plymouth to Tewkesbury, where he was buried before the high altar of the great abbey. A monument, now lost, was erected to his memory by his widow.
    By a strange irony, the de Clare family, in the manner of their predecessors in the Gloucester title, was to come to an end in 1314, after the death of the last earl, in the succession of three daughters and coheiresses and the partition of the family estates between them. 
    de Clare, Gilbert (I9661)
     
    5990 The death of James A. Bailey formerly of this village, occurred very suddenly at his home in Caledonia Thursday afternoon, January 6. Mr. Bailey who was the son of the late Major J.J. Bailey and Theodosa DeLong Bailey, was born in this village July 18, 1874. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Marie Haynes Bailey; one son John, two brothers George DeLong Bailey of this village and Dwight Bailey of Lima, Ohio, also an uncle, H.W. DeLong, Sr. of this village. Funeral services were held from the late home in Caledonia on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. R.G. Higginbottom officiating. Interment was made at Mumford.
    (The Dansville Express, Friday, January 13, 1928)

  • James Albert Bailey died suddenly at his home in Caledonia, NY on Jan. 5th. He was born in Dansville, NY on July 18, 1874, the son of John J. and Theodosia Delong Bailey. He graduated with the degree of Ph.B. He was a member of Alpha Tau Omega and the Savage Club. At the time of his death he was clerk of the village of Caledonia, and had been a partner in the Allen-Bailey Tag Company. He is survived by his wife Mrs. Marie Haynes Bailey, a son John, and two brothers.
    (Cornell Alumni News, March 1, 1928) 
  • Bailey, James A. (I46395)
     
    5991 The death of Mrs. Catherine Vosburgh, widow of the late Peter Vosburgh, occurred at 4 o'clock, Thursday afternoon. The cause ot death was cancer of the stomach, with which she had 'suffered many years. She was in the 67th year of her age. Mrs. Vosburgh was a member of St Paul's Lutheran church and was identified with the different societies connected therewith and at all times when in health ready to do active work for the church. She leaves four brothers, Jacob, Henry and Abram Staley living west of the city and Isaac Staley of Steuben oounty, and three sisters, Mrs. Philip House of Bennett's Corners, Mrs. Mary Young, of Parkersburg, Iowa, and Mrs. Hannah Clement of Dakota. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon from her late residence at 2:00 and at the Lutheran church, at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. P. W. Moots officiating. (Johnstown Republican 1893-1896) Staley, Catherine (I12362)
     
    5992 The death of Mrs. Lorenzo Hurlburt removes a most estimable woman of nearly 70 years of age, whose married life had been chiefly passed a few miles west of Cohocton, at the farm home on Oak Hill in the town of South Dansville, on which Mr. Hurlburt's grandfather, Moses Hurlburt, settled in 1806. She is survived by her husband, who served the Pamona Grange of Steuben County as Secretary for about thirty years, one son, Clyde L. Hurlburt, one daughter, Mrs. Lena Smith, of Dansville, one sister, Mrs. C.D. Nichols of Canaseraga, three brothers, A.V. Burdett, of Hornell, C.N. and F.M. Burdett, of the town of Howard. She had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for many years, also of the Eastern Star, Daughters of the American Revolution and the Grange. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon, by Rev. S.F. Gutelins, of Dansville, where they had moved a few months ago.
    (The Steuben Courier, Bath, New York, Friday, May 2, 1919) 
    Burdett, Abbie Maude (I1512)
     
    5993 The Esther Satterthwaite d/o William and Pleasant married James Worstal and not our Richard Mitchell. (see Wm Satterthwaite probate record of 1786).

    A marriage record of Hester Larzelere and Richard Mitchell in Penn 26Jun1771 (Newtown,PA) - I believe this is the other Richard Mitchell in Bucks Co.,PA (see 1790 census there are two Richard Mitchel's).

    I don't find where our Esther ever goes by Hester so this is helpful in distinguishing between them.

     
    Satterthwaite, Esther (I327)
     
    5994 The Evening Bulletin - Philadelphia; Tuesday, October 1, 1940, Page 33:

    "LOUGHRAN - Sept. 29, 1940, DORIS C., aged 16 years, daughter of Anna and late George Loughran, of 431 S. 57th st. Relatives and friends, also students of West Phila. High School invited to funeral, Thurs., 8.30 A. M., John P. Donohue & Sons, 5400 Market st. Solemn Requiem Mass, Transfiguration Church, 10 A. M. Int. Holy Sepulchre. Viewing Wed., 7.30 to 10 P. M."
     
    Loughran, Doris C. (I39582)
     
    5995 The extensive tannery of James Bunap, in Marlow, was destroyed by fire on Saturday morning, the 1st inst.. Loss from $15,000 to $20,00.... Gilbert Burditt, a young man who worked and slept in the tannery, was burned to death. He had once made his way outside, but went back to secure his personal effects and was seen no more alive."
    (Farmer's Cabinet, published as The Farmers' Cabinet.; Date: 10-14-1864; Volume: 63; Issue: 12; Page: 3, Amherst, New Hampshire) 
    Burditt, Gilbert M. (I19543)
     
    5996 The family Bible gives Reuben's birth date as Sept. 22, 1810 and his tombstone gives 1812. When about 12 years old Rueben moved with his parents to Burns, Allegany Co., NY, where he spent his youth and learned the trade of a stone mason from his father Conrad. Reuben was also a carpenter and built houses in Canaseraga.
    Reuben, son of George Conrad and Catherine Barkay Dieter married Catherine Markham, daughter of Darius Markham.
    Reuben and Catherine became parents of 17 children: Eliza Jane, Mary Ann, Caroline, Matthew Edward, Henrietta, Emma Elizabeth, Amariah N, Isaac A, Catherine, Rosetta, Lafayette, Fanny Isabella, Lovina, Ida Elowene, Matilda, Julia, and Charles who died young. These children were born in Steuben and Allegany counties, NY from 1840 to 1870. Reuben was killed in 1887, by an Erie train in Canaseraga, Burns Twp., Allegany County, NY. 
    Dieter, Reuben (I37731)
     
    5997 The family name originated from the village of Forest in the canton of
    Landrecies near Avesnes, France. The first record of the de Forest
    family was published in 1660 by Jean le Carpentier in his history of
    Cambresis in which he mentions Hubert de Forest, a Chevalier of the
    First Crusade in 1096. Between 1111 and 1120, Gerard de Forest
    witnessed a gift made by the Countess of Flanders and the Durchess of
    Lorraine in St. Amanden-Pevele. In 1171, Hugues de Forest and his
    brother Gilles made a gift of land to the Abbey of Marchiennes. A
    little later, in 1180, the Chevalier Ansel de Forest of Cambresis is
    mentioned as having sold "church tenths". Records of 1221 mention
    Gautier de Forest as Provost of Quesnoy and Bailli of Ghent. Seven
    years later, in 1228, Walter de Forest was Bailli of the Counties of
    Flanders and Hainaut, and a Pierre de Forest is mentioned in records
    of 1233. In 1383 to 1384 the records of the Count of Hainaut speak of
    purchasing two pigs from Jehan de Forest at a feast held in honor of
    St. Jehan in Quesnoy. There are other references to Jehan de Forest
    during this same period. In 1408, Thomas de Forest was taxed in the
    domain of Forest, and in 1436 there is mention of a freehold held by
    the Abbey and acquired from Thomas de Forest. In 1466, Pierre de
    Forest is mentioned in connection with several houses, fields and
    lands. In 1491, there is mention of Gilles, Gaspard and Melchoir de
    Forest. 
    de Forest, Gaspard (I17733)
     
    5998 The Fatal La Grippe. An Epidemic at Somerset Center--Mrs. Dr. Root and Daughter Die (News Article)
    Date: 1892-02-09; Paper: Jackson Citizen

    The Fatal La Grippe
    An epidemic at Somerset Center- Mrs. Dr.Root and daughter die within two hours of each other.
    Dr.Z.W. Waldron returned Tuesday from Somerset Center, where he was called to attend Dr. Root, who was dangerously ill with La Grippe.
    Mr.Root's wife died of the disease at 5 o'clock Friday morning and his daughter two hours later.They were buried Saturday morning, and Dr. Root came down with the disease himself. His condition this morning was much better and he will be about again in a few days.
    The grippe has been very severe in this locality, almost a epidemic, and a number of others have succumbed to the disease.
    The people are very much frightened from the malady, as its results have been so serious there. Nearly everyone in the village is suffering more or less from its effects.

    Research and transcription by JMB 
    Haynes, Susan Elizabeth (I5102)
     
    5999 The first of this family in Allegany was Joshua Vincent, who, in 1808,
    brought his family from Petersburg in Rensselaer Co., and, as an early
    settler. made a permanent home in Almond and Alfred among the Seventh
    Day " people, in whose religious faith he joined. He had a taste for
    mechanics and operated a carding mill a short distance below Baker's
    Bridge." He had two sons, David and Joshua, of whom David came when
    but a child from Petersburg to Almond alone on horseback. From
    thenceforth he lived in Almond, was for years a confidential employee
    of Hon. Clark Crandall. and died, when 68. on the farm his labor had
    developed from the wild land that he located. His wife survived him
    only from November to February. He married Freegift, daughter of
    Christopher and Lois (Coon) Saunders. Their children were Christopher.
    Amelia (Mrs. Russell Burdick), David. Lois, Abigail (Mrs. Tunis Van
    Antwerp), Orrin, Eli (died from wounds received in the battle of
    Gettysburg), Benjamin Morrill, Albert, John C., Joseph, Eleanor (Mrs.
    Philetus Andrews), Nathan, Jane (Mrs. Alonzo Rogers), Mary (Mrs. Henry
    Stillman), Susan (Mrs. John Cottrell).
    (Allegany County and Its People: A Centennial Memorial HISTORY OF
    ALLEGANY COUNTY,NY, John S. Minard; W.A.Fergusson & Co., Alfred,NY,
    1896) 
    Vincent, David (I28860)
     
    6000 The first three sons may not be children of Martha, however the
    Houghton genealogy believes it to be so(I think they may be sons of
    Isreal's cousin Daniel). 
    Wheelock, Martha (I468)
     

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